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  1. Made in the UK fashion blog

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  2. Bella Freud Love Hurts sweater in pink

    Freud was born in London, Englandon 17 April 1961. Her parents were Bernardine Coverley and Lucien Freud. Freud was the great-granddaughter of the famous psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud. Freud has one sister Esther Freud. Freud was raised in Marrakech, Morocco with her sister Esther. Esther chronicled their childhood in the book Hideous Kinky. Hideous Kinky was released in 1992 and adapted into a film in 1998. Their father Lucien Freud stayed in London and sent money to the family in Marrakech. Freud’s mother embraced a hippy lifestyle and embraced Sufism. Freud rebelled against her mother’s lack of boundaries and loved school and work. Freud went to study in Rome once she was old enough. 

    Freud was born in London, Englandon 17 April 1961. Her parents were Bernardine Coverley and Lucien Freud. Freud was the great-granddaughter of the famous psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud. Freud has one sister Esther Freud. Freud was raised in Marrakech, Morocco with her sister Esther. Esther chronicled their childhood in the book Hideous Kinky. Hideous Kinky was released in 1992 and adapted into a film in 1998. Their father Lucien Freud stayed in London and sent money to the family in Marrakech. Freud’s mother embraced a hippy lifestyle and embraced Sufism. Freud rebelled against her mother’s lack of boundaries and loved school and work. Freud went to study in Rome once she was old enough. 

  3.  Corona beer covid19 🍺

    New York (CNN Business) Corona beer isn't making any changes to its advertising despite the name's unfortunate similarity to the deadly coronavirus. 

    Constellation Brands (STZ), which brews several variations of the popular lager, said in a statement that its customers "understand there is no link between the virus and our business." 

    "Sales of Corona remain very strong and we appreciate the continued support from our fans," Constellation Brands spokesperson Stephanie McGuane told CNN Business. "Our advertising with Corona is consistent with the campaign we have been running for the last 30 years and is based off strong consumer sentiment."

    Constellation said Corona Extra sales grew 5% in the United States in the four-weeks that ended February 16. That's nearly double the trend of the past 52 weeks. Corona's sales are heavily dependent on the US market, unlike some of its far-more-international rivals.

    "Our thoughts and prayers go out to those affected by this terrible virus and we hope efforts to more fully contain it gain traction soon," said Bill Newlands, CEO of Constellation Brands, in a statement. "We've seen no impact to our people, facilities or operations and our business continues to perform very well."

    Yet the spread of the coronavirus couldn't have come at a worse time for Constellation, which is spending $40 million to launch its new Corona-branded hard seltzer. Part of the promotion includes a sponsored tweet that has sparked criticism for using the phrase "coming ashore soon." 

    Replies to the tweet say the ad is in "poor taste" and that the brand should "lay low for a few weeks."

    Two surveys released this week show that the Corona's brand is suffering from negative buzz. 

    5W Public Relations said that 38% of Americans wouldn't buy Corona "under any circumstances" because of the outbreak, and another 14% said they wouldn't order a Corona in public. The survey encompasses polling from 737 beer drinkers in the United States.

    In another survey conducted by YouGov, the firm found consumers' intent to purchase Corona fell to its lowest level in two years. The survey also showed that Corona's buzz score, a metric that that measures favorability, has dropped significantly since the beginning of the year.

    Constellation's Newlands said those reports do not reflect the company's business performance, calling the "misinformation" about the virus' impact on Corona's business "extremely unfortunate."

    Online searches for "corona beer virus" spiked in early February, but have since declined. 

    Constellation Brands' stock dropped 4% on Friday and 8% on Thursday, although the entire stock market has fallen sharply as fear grows about the spread of coronavirus. The number of cases have climbed to 83,577 globally Friday. Nearly 3,000 people have died from the virus.

    Read on CNN- https://edition.cnn.com/2020/02/28/business/corona-beer-marketing/index.html

  4. Happy new year 2020

    In 2020 the Made in the UK- Clothing, Fashion & Accessories Initiative (UKCFA) is celebrating it 10 years since it was founded. This year we will be sharing awards for UK fashion and releasing our special edition annual journal. The Made in the UK- Clothing, Fashion & Accessories Initiative (UKCFA) invite contributions of articles and papers on all aspects of UK fashion, style, costume and textiles to be published in the peer reviewed official journal.

    Accepted Formats:

    Articles are usually 3000-5000 words. Also interviews, case studies and photography in relation to UK fashion and costume. Submit through the UKCFA website https://www.ukfashion.org.uk/journal.html

  5. Sustainable Fashion London

    The annual Sustainable Fashion London event took place on the 19th september this year during SS19  London Fashion Week attended by representatives of some of the UK's world renowned brands, alongside sustainability professionals in support of sustainable fashion.

    The conference connects industry, organisations and leading researchers in fashion sustainability from across the UK and internationally with innovative talks and presentations, addressing the key themes of sustainable design, ethical production, retail and consumption, and education. "The aim is to provide a platform for sustainable fashion during fashion week and create a discussion about how the fashion industry can implement sustainable solutions to address the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals of Production and Consumption." says  co-founder Debbie Moorhouse.

    Sustainable Fashion London is  organised by the International Society For Sustainable Fashion in association with the Made in the UK- Clothing, Fashion & Accessories Initiative (UKCFA).

     

  6.  UK Fashion www.ukfashion.org.uk

    The Made in the UK- Clothing, Fashion & Accessories Initiative has been established for nearly 10 years, supporting UK fashion design and manufacturing businesses as a non profit charitable initiative with a community of over 18,000 members. In 2018 we are launching a new website, journal and logo mark. If you're not already a member, find out how to join on our website and subscribe to the journal.

    Certified Made in the UK organization now have around 50 member companies. Find UK brands, manufacturers and suppliers, or promote your own business.

    In 2016 we launched the Made With Love Global Initiative which helps businesses donate surplus products to people in need. Made in the UK members were the first to support, including several women owned businesses who donated clothes for pregnant women and children under 5 years old living at refugee camps in Greece. But we need more businesses to support the initiative and anyone with donations can contact us through our website. Whatever you have to give Made With Love will connect you with their partner charities.

  7. Meghan Markle style

    For a recent celebs fashion feature article the Made in the UK- Clothing, Fashion & Accessories Initiative was  asked to help decipher whether the key to Royal style is bespoke....

    Since marrying into the royal family, the Duchess of Sussex has showed off a wardrobe full of designer garments. Unlike many famous people, however, she buys a lot of her stuff from pre-existing collections, rather than having it custom-made. So how does everything fit her so perfectly? Well, I think I may have found the secret to Meghan Markle's royal wardrobeonce and for all.

    Markle has shown admiration for a range of brands since becoming a Duchess. Givenchy, currently helmed by British designer Clare Waight Keller, appears to be her favourite, having designed her bespoke wedding dress, her Royal Ascot look, and the outfit worn on her first trip with the Queen. But the 36-year-old also likes buying things straight off the rails.

    For the wedding of Prince Harry's cousin, she chose a blue-and-white printed dress from Oscar de la Renta's Resort 2019 collection. Due to its easy breezy style, it didn't appear that any alterations had been made to the original design.

    But her dusky pink Goat dress worn to celebrate Prince Charles' 70th birthday had definitely enjoyed some extra work. The original style has a slightly darker cuff on the sleeve. Markle's, meanwhile, was the same colour throughout, suggesting that some alterations were made.

    What was most interesting, however, was the bright yellow dress Markle donned on Thursday night. The sleeveless design came from American talent Brandon Maxwell's SS18 collection and looked to be the same as the one shown on the model.

    If you weren't aware that photoshoots require a lot of hidden clipping and pinning in order to give the illusion that a garment fits, you'll definitely know the feeling that comes with receiving an online order that looks totally different to what you were expecting. So the fact that Markle's yellow dress was fitted perfectly to her frame raises some questions. Namely, how does she do it?

    I spoke to a couple of experts to find out. Debbie Moorhouse, co-founder of Made in the UK — Clothing, Fashion & Accessories Initiative (UKCFA) and who has designed couture bridal and evening dresses, says that although she "wouldn't expect every Markle look to have been tailored and altered to fit perfectly," there is some evidence to suggest that the Duchess of Sussex visits a tailor every now and then.

    In fact, Markle was photographed back in March wearing a tell-tale sign of a tailor's influence. On the back of her navy J. Crew coat was an X-shaped white stick — otherwise known as a "tailor's tack" —which is used to keep the shape of garments that have a slit as they are transported. Either Markle or her stylist had clearly forgotten to remove it before stepping out to greet the public, which is, you know, easily done.

    Women's tailor Dara Ford agrees that Markle's "impeccable" style is the result of some clever tailoring. On the topic of that yellow dress, Ford proves that my eyes haven't got quite what it takes, saying that the style does in fact "look to have been altered." She explains:

    "Looking at the original, the neckline was actually a little higher and not quite the wide boatneck that she is wearing. Making this subtle change makes the dress her own and matches her signature style."

    Apparently, such an alteration would be pretty cheap too, with Ford estimating a cost of around £25.

    However, she doesn't agree with suggestions that the Goat dress worn for Markle's first post-wedding appearance has been altered. While the cuff may indeed be a different colour, Ford says that the dress "doesn't fit as well across the bust and waist. The result is a more unfinished look; one that isn't as consistent with the impeccable style we have come to expect from her."

    Debbie Moorhouse adds that designers will often either have a VIP department or meet with a client like Markle and create a bespoke design that offers a few subtle tweaks. "The Queen has her own private dressmaker Angela Kelly to ensure the perfect fit every time," she notes, "but Markle's clothes (and the Duchess of Cambridge's) look steamed and pressed to perfection which can make a lot of difference."

    So should all of us be looking to a professional tailor every now and then? Ford believes that a simple alteration can "make a big difference to someone's appearance." A psychological study by the University of Hertfordshire actually found that a person wearing a tailor-made suit versus an off the peg equivalent was deemed to be more confident, successful, and a higher earner after just three seconds.

    "This is even more important with seemingly simple styles such as the clean tailored looks Markle favours," continues Ford. "When the fabric is plain and there are few embellishments, there is nothing to distract from the fit."

    I'm relieved to hear that tailoring a store-bought garment is nowhere near as expensive as I thought. According to Ford, shortening a hem can cost as little as a tenner with dress alterations only setting you back £20 and jackets a little above that.

    While it might not be worth the money for certain outfits, following in Markle's footsteps for special occasion looks could turn a simple garment into something extra special. Now, where's my nearest tailor at?

  8. Sustainable Fashion London

    The first annual Sustainable Fashion London symposium took place during SS18 London Fashion Week in september. The conference connected industry, organisations and leading researchers in fashion sustainability from across the UK with innovative talks and presentations, addressing the key themes of sustainable design, ethical production, retail and consumption, and education.

    "The aim is to provide a platform for sustainable fashion during fashion week and create a discussion about how the fashion industry can implement sustainable solutions to address the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals of Production and Consumption." says event co-founder Debbie Moorhouse.

    Sustainable Fashion London was organised and funded by Certified Made in the UK and attended by members of the Made in the UK- Clothing, Fashion & Accessories Initiative including high profile brands. The intention is for Sustainable Fashion London to become an annual event during fashion week.

    For partnerships, sponsors and advertising enquiries, please contact us.

  9. Made With Love Global Initiative

    Made With Love is launching as a global charitable recycling initiative to support the fashion industry to reduce it's negative environmental impact and help people in need around the world. Around 1/3 of textiles discarded annually are good quality clothing items which
    could be reused. By donating surplus products and excess stock, manufacturers, brands and retailers can have a positive impact on the statistics.

    The first partner charity to this initiative to be announced is Dress For Success which empowers women across the world to achieve economic independence
    through their employment 'suiting programs'. These aim to provide disadvantaged women with professional interview and work attire. Made With Love are also supporting NGOs working at refugee camps in Greece who urgently require clothing for children aged 5 and under. According to Lauraine Velez from the NGO, Lighthouse Relief: "The children in Ritsona camp, one of the camps where we work, could really use these items. Since the camp has been set up in a former military compound, there is little shelter from the elements and the children get sick often." 

    Developed in partnership with Certified Made in the UK, Made With Love will be
    an ongoing initiative and many more partner charities will be announced soon.
    Co-founder, Debbie Moorhouse says "This is an opportunity for brands and the fashion industry to be a force for good and collectively make a difference while also improving sustainability."

    Businesses and individuals can join
    the initiative by contacting us through the Made in the UK- Clothing, Fashion
    & Accessories Initiative website and we will match your donations with our
    partner charities.